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PRESTON
Preston in the 18th Century  (excerpt by and thanks to Tim Lambert)

In the early 18th century a writer said Preston was: 'A pretty town with an abundance of gentry in it, commonly called Proud Preston'.

In 1688 James II was deposed as king of England and Scotland but in 1715 a Scottish army attempted to put his son, James III back on the throne. The Scottish army marched into Preston. Many of the townspeople were sympathetic as James II was a Catholic and Preston was a stronghold of Catholicism. Some townspeople joined his army.

However an English army soon marched to Preston. The defenders erected barricades and dug trenches. The first English attack on Preston was driven back. The English then set fire to the outskirts of Preston but, fortunately for the defenders, the wind was blowing away from the centre of the town and the flames did not spread.

Then English reinforcements arrived from the East and English soldiers completely surrounded the town. Realising their position was hopeless the Scots surrendered. They were held prisoner in the church and were fed on bread and water at the expense of the townspeople. Furthermore 12 people were executed for treason at Preston.

The Scots returned in 1745 and they marched as far as Derby but they then turned back. This time no battle took place in Preston.

In the 18th century Preston continued to trade with Europe. Hemp, timber and iron were imported from the Baltic region. Preston also traded with the West Indies. Some ships from Preston took part in the slave trade. For centuries wool and linen were woven in Preston. However by the late 18th century they had given way to cotton. The first cotton mill in Preston opened in 1771. Some cotton was made in mills but there were also hand loom weavers, who made cotton cloth in their own homes.

In the mid-18th century a writer said that Preston: 'may for its beauty and largeness compare with most cities. For the politeness of the inhabitants none can excel. Here is a handsome church and a town hall where the corporation meets for business and the gentlemen and ladies for balls and assemblies. Here is likewise a spacious marketplace in the midst of which stands a fine obelisk. The streets are neatly paved and the houses well built of brick and slates. The town being a great thoroughfare (i.e. a stopping place on the main road to Scotland), there are a good many inns for the travellers. This town has a pretty good trade for linen yarn, cloth, cotton etc.'The Scots returned in 1745 and they marched as far as Derby but they then turned back. This time no battle took place in Preston.

In the 18th century Preston continued to trade with Europe. Hemp, timber and iron were imported from the Baltic region. Preston also traded with the West Indies. Some ships from Preston took part in the slave trade. For centuries wool and linen were woven in Preston. However by the late 18th century they had given way to cotton. The first cotton mill in Preston opened in 1771. Some cotton was made in mills but there were also hand loom weavers, who made cotton cloth in their own homes.

In the mid-18th century a writer said that Preston: 'may for its beauty and largeness compare with most cities. For the politeness of the inhabitants none can excel. Here is a handsome church and a town hall where the corporation meets for business and the gentlemen and ladies for balls and assemblies. Here is likewise a spacious marketplace in the midst of which stands a fine obelisk. The streets are neatly paved and the houses well built of brick and slates. The town being a great thoroughfare (i.e. a stopping place on the main road to Scotland), there are a good many inns for the travellers. This town has a pretty good trade for linen yarn, cloth, cotton etc.

It is unclear what exactly Prestons Leather Industry consisted of however there were tanneries in the area that would supply the belts etc for driving the machinery in the cotton mills of the town.

Nowadays most of the leather product in the UK is imported, usually as finished furniture, shoes and other goods. Leather has certainly forged its place in the british household and with it companies like Ferndown Leather Services have come into existance to provide repair services to trade and general public. Ferndown Leather Services provides leather repair, cleaning and conditioning activities aimed at bringing leather back to as near its original state as possible prolonging its useable life and ensuring that the item continues to look good even after many years active & continual use.
Leather Repair in Preston, Lancashire
Leather Repair in Preston
Leather Repairs in Preston